Preventing Stroke with Diabetes

People with diabetes are 1.5 times more likely to have a stroke than people without (ADA, 2014). There are also several other factors that can increase your chance of having a stroke including high blood pressure and obesity. Many of the factors that increase your chances are more likely to occur if someone has diabetes.

Therefore, it is important that we learn how to take care of our bodies the correct way. If we do not take the steps needed to prevent a stroke, then we will be playing a game we cannot win. It is important to always take the first step in success when it comes to our health.

So, how can we prevent or lower our chances of having a stroke? There are several lifestyle changes that we can make in order to start lowering our chances now. There are some factors that we can’t control, such as age, but we should focus on what we can control.

One of the biggest lifestyle choices you should make is the decision not to smoke. Smoking can raise your blood pressure, and it increases your chances of cancer. Not only that, it makes it more difficult to manage diabetes and raises your risk of having a stroke.

Therefore, talk to your doctor about finding a way to quit smoking. You will not regret it. Although it might seem impossible, you can quit smoking with the help of your doctor, family, and yourself.

Another important factor is controlling your blood glucose levels. If you are able to maintain your blood sugar inside of your target range, then you will lower your risks. By allowing your blood sugar to become high and low frequently, you not only increase your chance of stroke, but you also increase your chances of other conditions.

Therefore, make sure to check your blood sugar levels consistently. This will help you to manage your diabetes and not let it control you.

You can also stay at a weight healthy for your height. If you are overweight or obese, try to cut 5% to 7% of your body fat. This will help you in controlling your blood sugar and lower your risk of having a stroke. This might seem difficult, but it is possible and well worth it.

Exercising regularly will also help you lower your risk for stroke. Try to get in 150 minutes of aerobic exercise every week and a few days of strength training. Talk to your doctor about setting up an exercise plan if you are currently not physically active.

Make sure to also check your cholesterol levels with your doctor. Changing dietary habits can help you get this under control. It will also help you to live a healthier lifestyle, while lowering your chance of having a stroke.

Limit how much alcohol you put in your system per day. I always suggest trying to get down to one a day at most. This will help you take control.

Consistently have your blood pressure checked to make sure you are not at risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke. By taking medications, you will also be able to manage the risks better.

Talk to your healthcare physician. They will be able to help you in lowering your risk of having a stroke.

Bibliography

American Diabetes Association. (2014). Stroke. American Diabetes Association. Retrieved from http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/heart-disease/stroke.html?referrer=https://www.google.com/

Dansinger, M. (2017). Diabetes and stroke. WebMD. Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/type-2-diabetes-guide/diabetes-stroke#1